Technical Levels in Review For Scottish Pacific Group Ltd (SCO.AX)

Traders have been closely following shares of Scottish Pacific Group Ltd (SCO.AX) recently. Focusing on moving averages, the 50-day is 2.63, the 200-day is at 2.67, and the 7-day is 2.72. Using the moving average for technical stock analysis is still quite popular among traders and investors. The moving average can be used as a reference point to help spot buying and selling opportunities. Using a longer term moving average such as the 200-day may help squash the noise and chaos that is sometimes created by daily price fluctuations. In some cases, MA’s may be used as strong reference points for figuring out support and resistance levels.

Scottish Pacific Group Ltd (SCO.AX)’s Williams Percent Range or 14 day Williams %R currently sits at -66.67. The Williams %R oscillates in a range from 0 to -100. A reading between 0 and -20 would point to an overbought situation. A reading from -80 to -100 would signal an oversold situation. The Williams %R was developed by Larry Williams. This is a momentum indicator that is the inverse of the Fast Stochastic Oscillator.

Scottish Pacific Group Ltd (SCO.AX) currently has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of -25.46. Active investors may choose to use this technical indicator as a stock evaluation tool. Used as a coincident indicator, the CCI reading above +100 would reflect strong price action which may signal an uptrend. On the flip side, a reading below -100 may signal a downtrend reflecting weak price action. Using the CCI as a leading indicator, technical analysts may use a +100 reading as an overbought signal and a -100 reading as an oversold indicator, suggesting a trend reversal.

Currently, the 14-day ADX for Scottish Pacific Group Ltd (SCO.AX) is sitting at 33.55. Generally speaking, an ADX value from 0-25 would indicate an absent or weak trend. A value of 25-50 would support a strong trend. A value of 50-75 would identify a very strong trend, and a value of 75-100 would lead to an extremely strong trend. ADX is used to gauge trend strength but not trend direction. Traders often add the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI) to identify the direction of a trend.

The RSI, or Relative Strength Index, is a widely used technical momentum indicator that compares price movement over time. The RSI was created by J. Welles Wilder who was striving to measure whether or not a stock was overbought or oversold. The RSI may be useful for spotting abnormal price activity and volatility. The RSI oscillates on a scale from 0 to 100. The normal reading of a stock will fall in the range of 30 to 70. A reading over 70 would indicate that the stock is overbought, and possibly overvalued. A reading under 30 may indicate that the stock is oversold, and possibly undervalued. After a recent check, the 14-day RSI is currently at 49.63, the 7-day stands at 44.97, and the 3-day is sitting at 34.20.

Investors often closely follow fundamental and technical data. Even with all the evidence, it can be tough to determine if the economy and the markets are preparing for a whole new breakout run. With the recent trend resulting in a series of new all-time record highs, investors will have to put the pieces together to try and gauge how long the second longest bull market in history will continue. Some professionals are still wondering if the next recession is looming, and if a bear market is right around the corner. Investors commonly strive to locate the highest probability of success. The next goal may be to capitalize on what could become the most interesting part of the record bull market. Investors will most likely be concentrating on what has proven to work in the past, which may offer a better idea as to how successful the strategies will be heading into the second half of the year and beyond.

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